A literary analysis and a comparison of odyssey by homer and the adventures of huckleberry finn by m

It used frontier humor, vernacular speech, and an uneducated young narrator to portray life in America.

A literary analysis and a comparison of odyssey by homer and the adventures of huckleberry finn by m

A literary analysis and a comparison of odyssey by homer and the adventures of huckleberry finn by m

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Racism and Slavery Although Twain wrote Huckleberry Finn two decades after the Emancipation Proclamation and the end of the Civil War, America—and especially the South—was still struggling with racism and the aftereffects of slavery.

By the early s, Reconstruction, the plan to put the United States back together after the war and integrate freed slaves into society, had hit shaky ground, although it had not yet failed outright.

As Twain worked on his novel, race relations, which seemed to be on a positive path in the years following the Civil War, once again became strained. The imposition of Jim Crow laws, designed to limit the power of blacks in the South in a variety of indirect ways, brought the beginning of a new, insidious effort to oppress.

The new racism of the South, less institutionalized and monolithic, was also more difficult to combat. Slavery could be outlawed, but when white Southerners enacted racist laws or policies under a professed motive of self-defense against newly freed blacks, far fewer people, Northern or Southern, saw the act as immoral and rushed to combat it.

Although Twain wrote the novel after slavery was abolished, he set it several decades earlier, when slavery was still a fact of life. Just as slavery places the noble and moral Jim under the control of white society, no matter how degraded that white society may be, so too did the insidious racism that arose near the end of Reconstruction oppress black men for illogical and hypocritical reasons.

In Huckleberry Finn, Twain, by exposing the hypocrisy of slavery, demonstrates how racism distorts the oppressors as much as it does those who are oppressed. As a poor, uneducated boy, for all intents and purposes an orphan, Huck distrusts the morals and precepts of the society that treats him as an outcast and fails to protect him from abuse.

This apprehension about society, and his growing relationship with Jim, lead Huck to question many of the teachings that he has received, especially regarding race and slavery.

Huck bases these decisions on his experiences, his own sense of logic, and what his developing conscience tells him. Through deep introspection, he comes to his own conclusions, unaffected by the accepted—and often hypocritical—rules and values of Southern culture.

Homer's addressing a character directly, using the vocative O (a sign of great respect), is very unusual. In The Iliad, this form of address is used only a couple times, and this is the only instance so far in The Odyssey. It may signal Homer's wish to exalt the nobility of a poor shepherd whose loyalty has been tested. This webpage is for Dr. Wheeler's literature students, and it offers introductory survey information concerning the literature of classical China, classical Rome, classical Greece, the Bible as Literature, medieval literature, Renaissance literature, and genre studies. These are some of the many databases available to you as a member of Middletown Thrall Library: Artemis (now Gale Literary Sources) Searches the following databases (described below): Literature Criticism Online, Literature for Students, Literature Resource Center, and Something about the Author.

His moral development is sharply contrasted to the character of Tom Sawyer, who is influenced by a bizarre mix of adventure novels and Sunday-school teachings, which he combines to justify his outrageous and potentially harmful escapades. Throughout the novel, Twain depicts the society that surrounds Huck as little more than a collection of degraded rules and precepts that defy logic.

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn: About | Study Guide | CliffsNotes

This faulty logic appears early in the novel, when the new judge in town allows Pap to keep custody of Huck. Again and again, Huck encounters individuals who seem good—Sally Phelps, for example—but who Twain takes care to show are prejudiced slave-owners.”The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn” by Mark Twain Essay Sample.

In the 20th Century, no other book was discussed or fought over more then The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, by Mark Twain. Adventures of Huckleberry Finn is the American Odyssey. This comparison suggests that Huck Finn is an American epic, and I believe that Mark Twain sensed that’s what he was writing when he began it in Critics of every school have had field days exploring the meanings of Huck’s adventures, and anyone familiar with their .

This webpage is for Dr. Wheeler's literature students, and it offers introductory survey information concerning the literature of classical China, classical Rome, classical Greece, the Bible as Literature, medieval literature, Renaissance literature, and genre studies.

The Odyssey Analysis

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Mark Twain The following entry provides criticism on Twain's novel The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn ().

Long considered Mark Twain's masterwork as well as a classic of American literature, The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn () was the first important American work to depart from European literary .

HOTLINKS: MISCELLANEOUS SCIENCE FICTION/FANTASY/HORROR FILMS My Competitors: other websites of film lists X-Rated Sci-Fi/Fantasy Videos Sci-Fi Attacks on Los Angeles See also TIME TRAVEL: MOVIES AND TV-MOVIES ABOUT TIME TRAVEL OR TIME-LOOPS, below.

Satire is a genre of literature, and sometimes graphic and performing arts, in which vices, follies, abuses, and shortcomings are held up to ridicule, ideally with the intent of shaming individuals, corporations, government, or society itself into improvement.

Although satire is usually meant to be humorous, its greater purpose is often constructive social criticism, using wit to draw.

Literary Terms and Definitions D